Personal Development

You Were Created For Many Purposes

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Have you ever wondered what your main purpose in life is? Do you constantly search for it but feel like you’re always coming up empty handed? Me too. In fact, I’ve been thinking about it a lot lately and am torn because the purpose I thought was mine, isn’t.

Last week while listening to a motivational speaker on YouTube named Michael Gebben, he really switched my thinking about finding one true purpose when he said: “What if there are a lot of purposes that you were created for…?”

What if there are a lot of purposes that you were created for? Wow!

This reminded me of how small the earth is in the universe. It reminded me of how small I am and how big my Creator is. How could I ever think that He created me and put me on this earth for a single purpose?

I once thought that my single purpose in life was to study theology, then to be a news anchor, and then to be in public relations. Now that I’ve had some time to rest and rediscover myself, I now know that I am not created for one single purpose, and neither are you. We are both created for many purposes.

Here are some exercises that you can do to start finding your many purposes in life:

1. Write down your skills/talents

Writing down what you’re good at on paper gives your brain a mental break. Sometimes hoarding all of that good stuff in your brain clouds your vision. Find a place to write it down, like a journal, and refer back to it often.

2. Find a mentor

Restarting a women’s ministry has been weighing heavily on my heart lately. I was holding all of these great ideas inside of me, afraid of failing before even beginning. To help get this project started I decided to talk to someone – two heads are better than one! Being able to run your ideas by another person is great because as well as getting feedback, there is another person equally excited about building what’s on your heart.

3. Journal

Recently a wedding photographer friend Instagrammed a photo of her journal. One page read, “Things that make me feel happy,” and the other read, “Things that don’t make me feel happy.” I took this up as a personal challenge. This exercise isn’t for the light hearted, in fact, give yourself a time limit of five minutes to complete this exercise before you blow your brain up. Although I was glad that the “things that make me happy list” was longer, I noticed a lot of my attention was focused on the things that didn’t make me happy. When we focus our energy on the positive stuff, it helps us see a clearer vision of our many purposes in life.

My challenge for you is to switch your mindset and think about all of the things you are good at. Think about how your skills, goals, and dreams can become purposes in your life. Leave your thoughts in the comments section below.

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