Journal

Tips for Making Meaningful New Year’s Resolutions

Lee Scott

The New Year is nearly upon us. How crazy is that? Have you started thinking of any New Year’s resolutions? I started thinking of a list a few days ago and it sort of looks like this: lose weight, eat less junk food, read more, start blog … again (you kind of get the jist of it). Believe it or not, I’m the epitome of New Year’s resolution makers; writing things down and not following through with any of it.

But then it occurred to me – maybe a lot of us never follow through with our resolutions because they aren’t meaningful. We write a list, follow it for about a month or so and give up. And I truly believe this is because we’re not taking enough time to reflect and write meaningful goals. So, how can you create meaningful goals? Glad you asked! Here are some helpful tips that will transform  your resolutions into specific, positive, personal and measurable goals.

Tip # 1: Make it specific 

Make your resolutions specific by expanding on your goal.

Don’t write: “Lose weight”

Write: “Lose 10 pounds in two months.”

Another great way to make your resolutions specific is to use this simple formula I learned in an Intro to Public Relations class: Goal + When + How. Here it is in action: (Goal) Lose 10 pounds + (When) in two months + (How) by working out five days a week.

Tip #2: Make it positive

Make your resolutions meaningful by making it positive.

Don’t write: “Eat less junk food”

Write: “Eat more fruits and veggies.”

Don’t forget about tip #1! How can you make this resolution specific and positive?

Tip #3: Make it personal

Make your resolutions personal by reflecting on why you want to complete this goal. Why do you want to lose 10 pounds or eat more fruits and veggies? I would want to complete these goals because I know what it’s like to actually care for my body. I know that doing a high impact workout is tough but worth the amazing stretch at the end. Reflect on how your resolution relates to you.

Tip #4: Make it measurable

When you finish making your resolutions specific, positive and personal, work on making it measurable.

There are different ways to measure your goals. My favorite way is to have weekly, bi-weekly or monthly check-ins with a mentor or someone that can hold you accountable. Give this person a copy of your resolutions and schedule time to meet. Discuss with this person your success, failures, ways to challenge yourself, etc.

If being held accountable to someone about your goals seems too daunting, jot down your measurements in a journal; as the year progresses, you can go back and reflect on your entries and make room for improvement.

As you head into the New Year, apply these tips to your list and see not only your list shrinking, but also your entire life to to a new level.

Do you have a resolution? Let us know in the comments below so we can cheer you on along the way!

– image credit: Lee Scott

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